Role of Teachers in Education

Role of Teacher in Education

Education encompasses both the teaching and learning of knowledge, proper conduct, and technical competency. It thus focuses on the cultivation of skills, trades or professions, as well as mental, moral and aesthetic development. Education is a two way process there is some giving person and taking person. So, a teacher plays a pivotal role in a system of education and its roles in education are facilitator, interpreter, translator, a guide etc. Education systems are established to provide education and training, in most of the cases for children and young. A curriculum defines what students should know and have to know, understand and be able to do as the result of education. Teaching also refers to learning facilitated by a real live teacher. Training refers to learning toward preparing learners with specific knowledge, skills, or abilities that can be applied immediately in practical life. Instruction refers to the intentional facilitating of learning toward identified goals, delivered either by an instructor or other forms. So, a teacher’s role is multifunctional. Teachers are knowledge facilitators but only for some, and for whom they were the creator of opportunity and potential. Schools provide the role of engineering for the society. According to U.S. Department of Labour Bureau of Labour Statistics (2001) teachers play an important role in fostering the intellectual and social development of children during their formative years. Teachers act as facilitators or coaches, using classroom presentations or individual instruction to help students learn and apply concepts in subjects such as science, mathematics, English etc.

How Role of Teacher is Important?

According to Rahman, et al; (2005) teachers play an important role in delivering new knowledge and skills to students. They are regarded as excellent and competent teachers by parents’ on the bases of excellent academic achievement of the students. Schools play a variety of important social, custodial and organisational roles in communities and with schools come teachers who have primary obligation to help students to learn how to recognize and solve problems, comprehend new phenomenon, construct mental models of those phenomena , and, given a new situation, set goals and regulate their own learning.

Learning and teaching always remain ‘the main game’ of education. To this end, teachers’ educational expertise needs to be strengthened, together with their professional knowledge, skills and dispositions. Teachers can then bring their wisdom to bear on the challenge new technologies pose for literacy education as well as for teaching more generally (Lankshear, 2000).

 

Teachers have a primary role in determining what is needed or what would work best with their students. Findings from research (Eslami & Fatahi, 2004) on teachers’ perceptions and beliefs indicate that these perceptions and beliefs not only have considerable influence on their instructional practices and classroom behaviour but also are related to their students’ achievement. Thus, knowing, the perceptions and beliefs of teachers enable one to make predictions about teaching and assessment practices in classrooms. Teachers clearly play a key role in the process of learning and education. Teachers, students, the educational atmosphere, the syllabi, and educational aids are the main components of the whole process without which it can neither start nor accomplish anything. The student is dependent on the teacher for the acquisition of knowledge. The existence or absence of an ideal educational atmosphere, a good syllabus, and effective aids does affect the objectives and quality of education, but only to an extent. These are neither absolutely necessary, nor does their absence halt the process. But the availability of an able and motivational teacher could end the students’ dependence on all other factors. It would take well-educated, caring and compassionate teachers-teachers trained in their subjects as per the needs of the students with respect to their gender, age, psyche and level of comprehension (Khalid &Khan 2006).

 Role of Teacher as Facilitator

The learners adopt a relativistic view in which one can see that knowledge is relative to the frame of reference that is applied to it by the learner, and that this needs to be taken into account when working with knowledge. Correspondingly now, the learner sees the role of a teacher as one of partner and facilitator in the development of knowledge. Knowledge is seen as certain or absolute and formal learning is a matter of absorption of the knowledge of the experts (e.g. teachers). It is described as ‘transitional knowledge’, a second stage in which learner begins to have doubts about the certainly of knowledge and gains a position where one acknowledges that there is both partial certainly and partial uncertainly. The third stage is ‘independent knowledge’ when learners recognize the uncertainly of the knowledge, and cope with this by taking the position that everyone has a right to her own opinion or beliefs. This seems to be the most sophisticated domain, that of ‘contextual knowledge’. In this knowledge is seen as constructed, and is understood in relation to effective deployment of evidence that best fits a given context. Teachers are, at this stage, seen as facilitators and partners in the process of the development of knowledge. The link between epistemological beliefs and learning is, of course, crucial (Moon, 2008).But with the passage of time and changes in ages also change the role and responsibility of a teacher.

Advertisements